Constructing superlatives

Constructing superlatives
Into the Wild
By Sarah Sawler

Imagine building a contemporary home, situated in a beautiful wooded area peppered with flowers. But that picturesque piece of land is a cliff, descending 100 feet over the length of the property. And that property is in the middle of Saint John. Architects Monica Adair and Stephen Kopp of Acre Architects had their work cut out for them when they began working on the two-year project they coined “Into the Wild”. They rose to the challenge by designing a home that complements its challenging surroundings and has a great deal of thought behind every detail—from the panoramic views to the rooftop patio.

Judith Mackin and Robert Moore's 2.3 acre property is as challenging as it is stunning. Despite the uneven land, Acre Architects made it work well by situating the home in the centre of the hill. They also incorporated the rustic hue of the surrounding rock by using upcycled wooden siding supplied by Centennial Wood and Corten steel from First Choice Ventilation. Photo Credit: Mark Hemmings, Hemmings House Pictures

Judith Mackin and Robert Moore’s 2.3 acre property is as challenging as it is stunning. Despite the uneven land, Acre Architects made it work well by situating the home in the centre of the hill. They also incorporated the rustic hue of the surrounding rock by using upcycled wooden siding supplied by Centennial Wood and Corten steel from First Choice Ventilation. Photo Credit: Mark Hemmings, Hemmings House Pictures

LEFT: Mackin and Moore are self-described minimalists. They carefully curate nearly everything that comes into the house, creating airy spaces punctuated with meaningful objects and art. The creative use of wall space makes this easier for them—note the vase perched on the wall ledge. The flooring, which is the same upcycled wood used for the siding, is another interesting feature of this room. Photo Credit: Mark Hemmings, Hemmings House Pictures RIGHT: According to Adair, Saint John is full of flat roofs. Acre took it one step further by creating a rooftop deck and a Xeroflor green roof with 12 species of sedums (a low, blooming ground cover). Not only does the deck provide extra space for entertaining, the green roof adds interest and provides an innovative way to manage storm water. Photo Credit: Mark Hemmings, Hemmings House Pictures

LEFT: Mackin and Moore are self-described minimalists. They carefully curate nearly everything that comes into the house, creating airy spaces punctuated with meaningful objects and art. The creative use of wall space makes this easier for them—note the vase perched on the wall ledge. The flooring, which is the same upcycled wood used for the siding, is another interesting feature of this room. Photo Credit: Mark Hemmings, Hemmings House Pictures
RIGHT: According to Adair, Saint John is full of flat roofs. Acre took it one step further by creating a rooftop deck and a Xeroflor green roof with 12 species of sedums (a low, blooming ground cover). Not only does the deck provide extra space for entertaining, the green roof adds interest and provides an innovative way to manage storm water. Photo Credit: Mark Hemmings, Hemmings House Pictures

LEFT: Tuck Studio, Mackin’s interior design studio, is located on level zero. Having her studio inside her home is convenient—but it’s also the perfect place for her to show off her modern sense of style. Adair says, “The studio reflects the ideas that went into the project. It’s a great framework for her because she lives in a contemporary home.” Photo Credit: Kelly Lawson RIGHT: Mackin and Moore are avid art collectors—but they love their view. Adair and Kopp gave them balance by incorporating huge windows and reserving wall space for art. Shown here is a sculpture by Marie-Hélène Allain, a painting by Bruce Pashak (right), and another by Doug Moore (left). The built-in wood storage saves space while adding an earthy element to the room. Photo Credit: Mark Hemmings, Hemmings House Pictures

LEFT: Tuck Studio, Mackin’s interior design studio, is located on level zero. Having her studio inside her home is convenient—but it’s also the perfect place for her to show off her modern sense of style. Adair says, “The studio reflects the ideas that went into the project. It’s a great framework for her because she lives in a contemporary home.” Photo Credit: Kelly Lawson
RIGHT: Mackin and Moore are avid art collectors—but they love their view. Adair and Kopp gave them balance by incorporating huge windows and reserving wall space for art. Shown here is a sculpture by Marie-Hélène Allain, a painting by Bruce Pashak (right), and another by Doug Moore (left). The built-in wood storage saves space while adding an earthy element to the room. Photo Credit: Mark Hemmings, Hemmings House Pictures

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*




ADVERTISEMENT