Raising the roof

Heavy industry
Nickel for Newfoundland’s time
By Jordan Whitehouse

Over four years and $4 billion later, construction of Vale Limited’s nickel processing plant in Long Harbour, Newfoundland, is almost done. When finished later this year, it’ll be one of the largest plants in the world using a new “hydromet” process that will produce 50,000 tonnes of nickel product per year.

Photos courtesy: Vale Newfoundland & Labrador Ltd.

7,600 pieces of equipment, 8.600 instruments, 6,700 tonnes of steel and 98,000 metres of electrical cable were installed across nine buildings on the site, including all of those in the main process area (shown here).

7,600 pieces of equipment, 8.600 instruments, 6,700 tonnes of steel and 98,000 metres of electrical cable were installed across nine buildings on the site, including all of those in the main process area (shown here).

Nickel concentrate arrives at the port facility from Vale's Voisey's Bay Mine and Concentrator in Labrador via bulk carrier and gets crushed and ground before heading to the main process area two kilometres north.

Nickel concentrate arrives at the port facility from Vale’s Voisey’s Bay Mine and Concentrator in Labrador via bulk carrier and gets crushed and ground before heading to the main process area two kilometres north.

The 182,000 sq. ft. neutralization building is one of the largest on the site. It's where iron and other impurities are removed, residue solids are neutralized and effluent treatment circuits are housed.

The 182,000 sq. ft. neutralization building is one of the largest on the site. It’s where iron and other impurities are removed, residue solids are neutralized and effluent treatment circuits are housed.

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